Art, Books, Experimental, Hauntings, Poims, short-short, Young Adult

Were I the Reflection within the Mirror

Were I the Reflection Within the Mirror

Were I the reflection within the mirror,
So skillfully,
So tastefully drawn, by time
And circumstance,
To stand erect and aloof, contemplating the contour lines
Of a face drawn and haggard
By the ravages of age.
I could dance amidst the tick-tock
Magic of days,
Wander through the empty, labyrinthine halls
Of SELF,
Scream at the lonely hours hissing by
In somnolent reverie; and wonder, oh wonder, Where truth ends,
Reality stops,
And reflective illusion takes the reigns…

Help support our work via secure PAYPAL:
http://www.paypal.me/extremevolumepop

Standard
Books, Hardboiled, Noise, Poims, Uncategorized

Sayings of Redbeard – Ragnar Redbeard

The infernal wisdom and heroic verse of the mysterious “Ragnar Redbeard” is preserved here, in this tiny, forgotten tome from another day, another age. The fierce, brutal logic of the author of “Might is Right” is presented herein, along with his epic songs and exhortations to Thor, Odin, and old, battle-hardened, bloodthirsty gods from the long ago. Whether you worship Odin or simply revere the brutal, cynical logic of the strange wordsmith who advocated a “World of warring atoms,” you will not fail to delight in this small book, available again in print for the first time in many, many long and silent decades. From an original, crumbling edition of 1890.

ragbeard

PURCHASE AT LULU:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/ragnar-redbeard/the-sayings-of-redbeard/hardcover/product-23229312.html

Standard
Books, Dreams and Nightmares, Experimental, Fiction, Poims, Short Stories, short-short, surreal, Uncategorized, Weird

One Night in a Dutch Hostel

WE must have been stranded in Amsterdam, at the world’s oldest, ugliest youth hostel. The girl that was with me had red hair and freckles, pale skin. (Note: It is my studied observation that, at least in my dreams, I am always somehow fucking death.)

Outside the window, crossing the pavement, a swarthy man in tight shorts, with a bulging, flabby gut is walking around like the proverbial caged animal of yore, apparently the sap rising in his veins or whatever passes for virility in this day and age.

“The sonofabitch has a higher testosterone count than I,” say I, turning to the girl, whom I instruct must not only froog in the upstairs window, but must thrust her head out and let fall her long tresses Rapunzel-like, so that the potential customer milling about below might crawl up them toward paradise, heaven, Nirvana.

“It’s not working,” say I. “Fish won’t bite.”

“Maybe he’s scared it’s some sort of sting operation,” she say, licking dry, greedy lips in the waning light of an amber sunset glow. Funny I think, the walls in here collect red from the light.

Red, red, everything is red. Hair, freckles; her body, though, is translucent white.

I crawl on top of her. It is late and maybe there is some requisite appreciation of the role I am playing as the impromptu pimp/provider. She covers my mouth with her own before wiggling, jelly-like, out from under my bulk. “I can’t fuck you,” she say. “Sorry.”

I think that this is a completely understandable position for her to take. My repressed sexual drive, however, seems to have made manifest in the turbulence of the barometric drop; as night falls, vast storm clouds seem to roil and brew across the curiously desolate face of Alternate Amsterdam.

(Isn’t this the way it is in gothic hokum stories of mad families living atop reeking, stinking tarns, stories wherein the desolation and madness of the incestuous line is made manifest in the heaving, wild weather, the environment that spills out of the pages and into the desolate soul of the reader, as he [alternately she] envision a living Sheol?)

At some point in the night, I prowl the musty, too-close claustrophobic halls, beating the walls with a club as if looking for hollow spaces. I suppose I was dress-rehearsing a murder, but, as fantastic as it sounds, vast, shimmering clouds of what I could only take to be some sort of globular, mist-like lightning began to shine through the windows, seeping uncannily through the cracks in the plaster. prerecorded and clearly artificial feminine telephone operators are being loudspeakered from some distant park, sounding as if they are trying to coax a 747 out onto the runway.

The Redhead is sitting Siva amidst a glowering crowd of scruffy but undeniably blonde young men. The central figure, a young man not unknown to me, looks upward as I enter, his face a soft pillow of stupid, bovine expectancy. I suppose I could have cleaved his face in twain; or, at the very least, crushed his skull like an egg with the powerful force of my wooden cudgel.

Instead, I compose this poem.

“Lying in bed, I turn over stare blankly as shadows roll across the wall. You bitter red pill that you are, hard to swallow in one exquisite mouthful.

“‘I suppose,’ you say, ‘I taste hot and rank.’
“I dunno, but, for one moment, an entire world lived and died on the tip of my tongue, rolling one bead of sweat down to die…”

Standard
Books, Fiction, Ghosts, Poims, Public Domain, Quotes, Spiritism, Young Adult

The Silver Sixpence by Ethel Clem (?) 1905 (?)

The following poem was found, uncredited, in an edition of the book The Tower of Wye by William Henry Babcock. The book dates from 1901. This copy is inscribed to “Ethel Clem, 3-05” and a card inside proclaims “from Sophomore and Junior.” A yellowed piece of paper has the following poem written, uncredited, in shaky pencil.

The Silver Sixpence

BY

Unknown (Ethel Clem?)

It was only a silver sixpence,
battered and worn and old,
But worth to the child that held it,
As much as a piece of gold.

A poor little crossing-sweeper,
In the wind and rain all day —
For one who gave her a penny,
There were twenty who bade her nay.

But she carried the bit of silver–
A light in her steady face,
And her step on the crowded pavement,
Full of childish grace.

Straight to the tender pastor,
And, “Send it,” she said, “for me,
“Dear Sir, to the heathen children,
On the other side of the sea.”
***

I don’t believe in coincidences, nor do I think a poem such as this should be lost. If anyone knows the true authorship, let me know.

Standard
Books, Fiction, Ghosts, Humor, Murder, Music, Poims, Short Stories, short-short, Weird, Young Adult

The Ballad of Klondike Kate

Oh the roughest young gal that you ever did see
Was a pert young lass out of Tennesee;
Who fancied finding gold was in her fate–
So she headed up north did Klondike Kate.

Klondike Kate just couldn’t wait,
Fancied findin’ gold was in her fate;
Klondike Kate was her brand new name–
She was rootin’,tootin’, scootin, shootin gold rush dame.

She went up north to the frozen land
(Was the mighty Yukon not the Rio Grande)
Was cold as ice and frozen too,
But Kate surried on cause she was tried and true.

Klondike Kate was a prospecting lass,
With a tin pan gullet and a burro ass;
She went to cities, she drank in the towns;
Klondike Kate knew her way around.

She hired a team to go with her,
Into the mountains where the gold diggers were;
But the indians said stay away from there,
“There’s a winter storm coming so you must beware!”

Klondike Kate just couldn’t wait!
Never mind the dark clouds hanging over her fate:
She lead her team of miners up the mountain trail
To a log cabin perched right on the edge of hell.

Well the wind started howling and the snow did blow
(And the men knew they had no other place to go)
Stuck in the mountains they found a shack–
But were soon gettin’ hungry caus for food they lacked!

Klondike Kate had sealed their fate!
Now huddled together for death they wait!
Gettin’ hungrier and hungrier they soon debate:
Which one of the dead would be best to eat?

Nobody knew Kate wasn’t a man,
For she glued on whiskers and called heself Dan!
In the middle of the night old Dan did rise,
While the others were asleep to give them a surprise

Klondike Kate never had no hate,
But she knew she would starve if she had to wait,
To eat her fill as they were snowed in–
And she didn’t think survivin’ was a terrible sin

One jumped up and begin to fight,
But Kate aimed the barrel and put that one right!
The other started howling and begin to moan
So Kate slit his throat to the spinal bone!

Klondike Kate never did debate,
If killing the men was or wasn’t her fate!
Of their cold blue flesh she surely ate;
All the better for her powerful hunger to sate!

Well she cut their flesh into jerky beef,
And waited and waited for a little relief;
Eventually she left that cabin of woe,
And made her way to town through the meltin’ snow.

Klondike Kate made her way to town,
As the world was turnin’ from white to brown…
And the soldiers at the fort all scratched their heads
In wonder that she wasn’t in the mountains dead!

Klondike Kate never did let on
That her menfolk companions was dead and gone.
She dropped their meat in the frozen snow…
Oh! Listen to the howlin winds scream and blow!

Now she pours the beer at the “Bucket of Grue,”
(And some say this story ain’t even true!)
But Old Kate she just a smiles and grins
That no one ever did find out that she ate them men!

Standard
Books, Music, Poims, Young Adult

Only a tramp on the street,
Has known suffering and toil and pain;
Only an old bindlestiff,
Who lies drunken and soaked in the rain.
With an old sack of burlap and twine,
He carries his burdens all day;
Only a tramp on the street
Could whistle along life’s hard way.

Only a clown in the rain
Could know tragedy, heartache and grief;
As his tears spill across his red grin,
And life’s agonies test his belief.
In the sunset as children are tucked
Into sleep while the old rub their bones,
And the clown rests his head on the dust
For laughter his suffering atones.

A leper caught out in the rain,
Once grinned a cracked grin as he said:
“There’s life in these old bones of mine,
Though my body belongs with the dead.
I suffer a monstrous disease,
And my face looks a sight to behold.
But a tramp and a clown and brought me in
And I felt I was one of the fold.”

Now I’ve known me a tramp and a clown,
And a leper I’ve seen by and by,
And life’s burdens are many and hard,
And they dog at your heels till you die.
But a tramp and a leper and clown,
Have showed me a rare fortune indeed–
Don’t weep over worrisome luck,
Don’t covet the things you don’t need.
–Author Unknown

Only a Tramp on the Street (1894) Author Unknown

Quote